Lingering Spaces: A Drifting Walking Tour of some of LCC’s Learning Landscapes | UAL

Lingering Spaces: A Drifting Walking Tour of some of LCC’s Learning Landscapes

Event date
14 March 2019 (4pm to 5pm)
Location
London College of Communication
Status
Open
Contact
events@lcc.arts.ac.uk

Thursday 14 March 2019
4 – 6pm
Lower Gallery
London College of Communication
Elephant & Castle, London, SE1 6SB.
Free and open to all UAL Staff/Students
Book your place here.

Mark Ingham, Reader in Critical and Nomadic Pedagogies and Paul Myers, LCC’s Director of Change Management will take you on a walking tour of some of the new and innovative learning spaces that have been created at LCC over the last couple of years.

Paul, from his research into learning spaces, will discuss what the characteristics of the pedagogical spaces needed by the college are, as well as the use of neighbourhoods to help support teaching and learning.

Mark will introduce his research into liminal learning spaces, such as the corners, edges, and informal spaces of and between neighbourhoods.  Mark will ask the question: ‘how can we prevent ‘learning-loss’ when we design a space ‘pedagogically’, as much as we do when designing spaces for minimum ‘heat loss’?’ 

Research Fortnight is our annual celebration of research across UAL. This year’s programme at LCC dives deep into the creative work of staff and students. It features events and exhibitions exploring themes of conflict, reconciliation, displacement, refugee experience, and social justice. 

Central to research in our schools of Screen, Design, and Media is a commitment to socially-engaged practice, visible in our teaching and accessible to our students.

Join us as we examine contemporary cultural politics through creative practice.

4 – 15 March 2019.

Related Events

Sound Arts Visiting Practitioners Series 2019

10 January 2019 – 14 March 2019
Location: London College of Communication
This series of visiting speakers is co-hosted by LCC’s department of Sound Arts and Design and UAL’s research centre for Creative Research into Sound Arts Practice and is curated by Dr John Wynne.
Read more

CV Checks

6 January 2019 – 15 March 2019
Location: University-wide
CV Checks drop in service.
Read more

CV Checks

6 January 2019 – 15 March 2019
Location: UAL
CV Checks drop in service. Come along to one of our regular 15 min CV Check sessions for feedback on your CV and to receive information about how Careers and Employability can help you with your career development.
Read more

Teaching Complexity: Online Seminar Series

8 January 2019 – 5 March 2019
Location: Online Seminar
Join us for an open online seminar series curated by Dr Bonnie Stewart (Visiting Fellow, UAL) and David White (Head of Digital Learning, UAL), exploring how open approaches to teaching and learning can help students navigate complexity.
Read more

Sound Arts Visiting Practitioners Series 2019

10 January 2019 – 14 March 2019
Location: London College of Communication
This series of visiting speakers is co-hosted by LCC’s department of Sound Arts and Design and UAL’s research centre for Creative Research into Sound Arts Practice and is curated by Dr John Wynne.
Read more

CV Checks

6 January 2019 – 15 March 2019
Location: University-wide
CV Checks drop in service.
Read more

CV Checks

6 January 2019 – 15 March 2019
Location: UAL
CV Checks drop in service. Come along to one of our regular 15 min CV Check sessions for feedback on your CV and to receive information about how Careers and Employability can help you with your career development.
Read more

Teaching Complexity: Online Seminar Series

8 January 2019 – 5 March 2019
Location: Online Seminar
Join us for an open online seminar series curated by Dr Bonnie Stewart (Visiting Fellow, UAL) and David White (Head of Digital Learning, UAL), exploring how open approaches to teaching and learning can help students navigate complexity.
Read more

Sound Arts Visiting Practitioners Series 2019

10 January 2019 – 14 March 2019
Location: London College of Communication
This series of visiting speakers is co-hosted by LCC’s department of Sound Arts and Design and UAL’s research centre for Creative Research into Sound Arts Practice and is curated by Dr John Wynne.
Read more

— Read on www.arts.ac.uk/whats-on/lingering-spaces-a-drifting-walking-tour-of-some-of-lccs-learning-landscapes

Who Controls the Future? 

Who Controls the Future? 

 

“A concept is a brick. It can be used to build a courthouse of reason.  

Or it can be thrown through the window.” 

 

“There will be a number of ‘trials’ throughout the duration of the exhibition, where a jury composed of members of the archive/ staff at UAL and student alumni will debate the relative merits of each submitted object before an audience, with the aim of inclusion in our Room 2084.” 

 

In fuzzy set theory, there are DEGREES of inclusion 

 

“In classical set theory, the membership of elements in a set is assessed in binary terms according to a bivalent condition — an element either belongs or does not belong to the set. By contrast, fuzzy set theory permits the gradual assessment of the membership of elements in a set; this is described with the aid of a membership function valued in the real unit interval [0, 1]. Fuzzy sets generalize classical sets, since the indicator functions of classical sets are special cases of the membership functions of fuzzy sets, if the latter only take values 0 or 1.[3] In fuzzy set theory, classical bivalent sets are usually called crisp sets. The fuzzy set theory can be used in a wide range of domains in which information is incomplete or imprecise,…” 

 

Authenticity/Trustworthyness – Is it the genuine article = False/Fake/Corrupt 

 

Integrity – Is it complete and reliable. = Dishonesty 

 

Provenance – Does the item have a history, is it connected with the donor/creator.  

 

Evidentiality – is the record a testimony of the creator’s activities, personality, cultural identity. 

 

Informational value – the importance of the information contained in the record. 

 

Educational/research use – Is the item/record of educational/research use for the collecting organisation. 

 

Accessibility – Is it useable by researchers, does it require specific access or storage equipment/materials.  

 

Conservation – fragility, risks and storage costs of the record. = Ephemeral  

 

Inter-relatedness – are there related items that are being offered or that already rest in the archive centre. 

 

Uniqueness of the record. 

 

Collection policy – Does the item fit into the collection policy 

 

“we need to turn our attention to the silent fascism that is becoming normalized through the systematic violence seeping into the laws and everyday administration practices of the nation-state, and to assess the mechanisms of oppression and the various symptoms of contemporary fascism that are being presented as unavoidable, pragmatic necessities.” 

 

“It now becomes clear that consistency is not a property of a formal system per se, but depends on the interpretation which is proposed for it. By the same token, inconsistency is not an intrinsic property of any formal system.” 

 

“You’re not serious, don’t say serious 

Cause I say serious, you wanna get serious? 

Let’s get serious, you can’t act serious 

So don’t say serious about serious.” 

 

“If I decide to be an idiot, then I’ll be an idiot on my own accord” 

 

“I force myself to contradict myself, so as to avoid conforming to my own taste” 

 

“We adore chaos because we love to produce order.” 

 

“I’m terribly confused,” 

 

“All generalisations – perhaps except this one – are false.” 

 

“…a consistency proof for [any] system … can be carried out only by means of modes of inference that are not formalized in the system … itself.” 

 

“Contrariwise,….if it was so, it might be; and if it were so, it would be; but as it isn’t, it ain’t. That’s logic.” 

 

“Well, now that we have seen each other,” said the unicorn, “if you’ll believe in me, I’ll believe in you.” 

 

“Break a vase, and the love that reassembles the fragments is stronger than that love 

which took its symmetry for granted when it was whole.”  

 

Derek Walcott  

 

The Theory and Practice of ‘Theory and Practice’ in Art and Design HE

17 May 2017

9.30am to 4.30pm

Location:

Red Room

Chelsea College of Arts John Islip Street

SW1P 4JU

View in map

Event Status:

Open

Event Contact:

Teachingexchange@arts.ac.uk

Overview
This teaching platform will look beyond the simple binaries between theory and practice and put into focus the evolving pedagogical relationships between these two different yet intertwined disciplines.

It seeks to be inclusive of current theories and practices that relate theory and practice. It aims to question contemporary theories and practices, which support ‘theory and practice’ in Art and Design undergraduate courses in the UK.

The conference will consider the long and complex history of the ways in which theory and practice has been taught on arts undergraduate courses in the UK. From the Coldstream Reports in 1969/70 with the introduction of Art History and Complementary studies on an undergraduate degree in Art and Design and the subsequent developments in Critical Theory, Cultural Studies, Complimentary and Contextual Studies.

As Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak (1990 p2) argues, “Since practice is an irreducible theoretical moment, no practice takes place without presupposing itself as a example of a more or less powerful theory,” then can we now see the possibility of there being no difference between theory and practice being the future of the pedagogies of theory and practice in UK undergraduate courses?

The conference will reflect on how different writing practices support the relationships between theory and practice in contemporary Arts education. As this education, now contextualised within the massification of the University sector, involves preparing students for the world beyond university, we ask how can these writing practices support this preparation?

What will I learn?
This teaching platform will offer an opportunity for art and design educators to explore some of the historical and evolving relationships that theory has with practice and practice has with theory.

Themes covered by the day will include: writing practices; the possibilities of being no difference between theory and practice; the future of the relationships between theory and practice in UK undergraduate courses; curriculum models and pedagogies that most effectively support the integration of theory and practice.

Who should attend?
This event is open to academics, technicians, support tutors and librarians who have an interest in the relationships between practice and theory.

Spivak, G. C., Harasym, S. (ed) (1990) The Post-Colonial Critic: Interviews, Strategies, Dialogues. Routledge. New York & London

Draft Programme (subject to change)

0930-1000 Registration and Coffee
1000-1010 Introductions – Prof Susan Orr, David Webster
1010-1110 Workshop with Dr Mark Ingham
1110-1130 Refreshments and Networking
1130-1220 Keynote with Dr Julia Lockheart
1230-1320 Lunch
1320-1420 Roundtable discussion
1420-1500 Degrees of Separation – Alumni Presentation & workshop
Carlotta Solari and Michel Erler
1500-1530 Refreshments
1530-1615 Future Theory:
Craig Burston
Katharine Dwyer
1615-1630 Plenary

Speaker Biographies

Craig Burston is Course Leader on BA (Hons) Graphic and Media Design at London College of Communication.  His teaching emphasis focuses on the practical testing and application of semiotic theory, the interplay between analogue and digital media and the impact of new technologies upon aesthetics.  Craig’s ongoing practice based research explores the relationship between iconic representation, memory and communication and has manifested itself through a range of output including audio-visual collaborations, gallery installations, research seminars and comic strips.  With photographer and digital media artist Richard Tomlinson, Craig is also the co-founder of skip-rat designs, latterly skipratmedia. Twitter: @skipratmedia

Katharine Dwyer spent a decade working in a corporate environment before returning to study Fine Art at UAL. Katharine completed her Master of Fine Art (MFA) at Wimbledon College of Arts in 2016. Her art pratice explores languages of authority, both personal and institutional, which are used to manufacture consent in the modern workplace. Twitter @tumble33

Dr. Mark Ingham is the Contextual and Theoretical Studies Coordinator at London College of Communication.  Mark is a fine artist who uses old SLR film cameras and LED lights to create multiple slide projectors in large scale art installations. His art and design research includes, relationships between autobiographical memory and photography, Gilles Deleuze’s and Felix Guattari’s ideas of ‘Becoming Rhizomatic’. His pedagogical research into the relationships between theory and practice and their roles in art and design disciplines has made him acutely aware of the importance of an holistic approach to teaching. He used his knowledge of making and doing skills, including design and multimedia software, in combination with his practical and theoretical knowledge to give students a full and rounded educational experience. Twitter: @malarkeypalaver

Dr Julia Lockheart is the director of the Writing-PAD project and co-editor, with Professor John Wood, of the Journal of Writing in Creative Practice. She has studied both Fine Art and TESOL to MA level and is also qualified to teach adults with SpLDs (Dyslexia).  Julia has a PhD in Design from Goldsmiths, University of London.  Her research focussed on developing tools for co-writing in design teams.  She has presented and published both nationally and internationally. Twitter: @jollyjewels

Prof Susan Orr is Dean: Learning, Teaching and Enhancement at University of the Arts London. Susan has written extensively on the subject of art and design assessment and her more recent work explores various aspects of art and design pedagogy in higher education. Susan is editor for the journal Art, Design and Communication in Higher Education, and on the editorial board of three further journals.  Susan is on the Executive of CHEAD (Council for Higher Education in Art and Design) and GLAD (Group for Learning in Art and Design). In 2010, Susan was awarded a Higher Education Academy National Teaching Fellowship. This was awarded in recognition of her teaching, leadership, research and contribution to art and design HE pedagogy. Twitter: @Susan_K_Orr

Carlotta Solari is multidisciplinary designer and artist, and Michel Erler is a designer and researcher. Both are recent graduates from BA (Hons) Interaction Design Arts at London College of Communication (UAL). Twitter @SolariTotti @MichelErler

David Webster is Associate Dean: Learning, Teaching and Enhancement for Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon Colleges at University of the Arts London.
Twitter @webster858

Teaching Platform Series 
This event is part of a series hosted by University of the Arts London, exploring key issues in Arts teaching and learning in higher education. Each event includes leading speakers sharing current thinking in creative education and is designed to be interactive: delegates will have opportunities to engage in activities to support networking and engagement.

For more information about Teaching and Learning at UAL visit the Exchange website.  To subscribe to our mailing list for more details about these and other events, please email teachingexchange@arts.ac.uk, or follow us on Twitter @UALTLE.

 

“Mark, How did you know any thing before the Internet existed?”

Designs on eLearning conference

NYC New School
21 – 22 September 2016
“Mark, How did you know any thing before the Internet existed?”
21 September 11:30 Room 3

Presenter: Mark Ingham
Institution: London College of Communication, University of the Arts London
Theme: Anxiety and Security in the Curriculum
Format: workshop
Description
The During a debate about the reasons why conspicuous theories are perpetuated and are still prevalent today a first year BA art and design student with a puzzled mixture of bewilderment, arrogance, anxiety and concern asked me how my pre digital generation knew anything before the Internet existed.

This group of very articulate students seemed both highly sceptical of any knowledge from any source yet wanted to believe in unfounded and contentious conspiracy theories. They gave the same credence to a highly qualified structural engineer as a basement blogger. Both sources were seen as ‘opinions’ and both as equally legitimate.Digging deeper into this it seemed that they thought the older generations were too accepting of ‘authority’ and their internet savvy generation were just being more open and more thoughtful.

This worshop will interrogate this paradox of accepting what is on the Internet as all the same yet at the same time distrusting well researched information based on prior experiments or prior knowledge. It will also attempt to answer the question, ‘How did we know anything before the Internet?’

Timetable
Setting up the debate, ‘Why do conspiracy theories still exist and what role has the Internet palates in perpetuating them’. The participants will be divided into two opposing debating groups each with an conflicting statement. They will then debate each other’s ideas. There will then be a plenary session of 20 minutes to discuss the ideas from the debate.

Interaction
This will be a very hands on session where I will recreate the debate format of the session I had with students. It will become a debating chamber.

Takeaway
A more nuanced understanding of the reasons why students are anxious and yet arrogant about the supply of knowledge in our digital age.

Outcomes
The outcomes of this session will be fed back into UALs digital pedagogical strategy through our Learning and Teaching days. It will also be disseminated on the LCC School of Design Contextual and Theorectical course and unit blogs.

REGISTER NOW
PARALLEL SESSIONS IN ROOM 3

“Mark, How did you know any thing before the Internet existed?”